After 2 consecutive nights spent on a sleeper bus, Nick and I arrived to Dong Ha at 5am in the pouring rain. We were welcomed to Central Vietnam with the beginning of the rainy season.

Most tourists visit the caves in Dong Hoi, however due to flooding, Nick and I headed to nearby Dong Ha to visit the demilitarized zone (DMZ). This 6 mile stretch divides the north and south and millions of tons of ordinances were dropped here during the American War. It is estimated that about 1/3 did not explode. At the Mine Action Visitor Center, we saw various cartoons created to educated children on the dangers of these explosives. Every year hundreds of people are killed and injured, mostly children and ethnic minority groups. As always, learning and remembering war is heavy on the heart.

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Vietnamese Propaganda Poster

In 1966, just north of the DMZ, the villagers of Vinh Moc carved an extensive tunnel system to escape aerial and artillery attacks. These tunnels are 40- 75 feet below the surface and are extremely elaborate with 13 entrances. We met 1 of the 17 children born in the tunnels and can only imagine the life lived in the dark damp earth. As we walked to and from the caves we passed multiple craters from American artilery explosions.

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Vinh Mac Tunnels

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Man pointing to himself as a child living in the tunnels

We purchased tickets for the 8am train from Dong Ha to Hue (pronounced ‘Hway’), however as always, things don’t go as planned. The train was not running (the reason lost in translation) and the next bus (that should be running hourly) would not leave for another 12 hours. So, Nick and I sat on the side of the highway and drank coffee. To our surprise, we were able to flag down a small van with a sign that read Hue. After overpaying and getting squished in with 22 locals we arrived in Hue, welcomed by another torrential downpour.

The main attractions in Hue are the citadel and tombs, however to see these one must pay almost half of Nick and I’s daily budget. Neither of us were extremely interested so we decided to rent a motorbike and take ourselves on a self guided tour of free attractions and food. The food in Hue has been the best on our travels thus far. The influence of the north and south make for fresh and spicy dishes.

Stacia and Nick’s Scenery Tour

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Thien Mu Pagoda – Behind this Pagoda you can see the car that Thich Quang Duc (monk) drove on June 11, 1963. When he arrived in Ho Chi Minh City, he got out of his car, sat in lotus position and self-immolated himself to protest the governments discrimination against Buddhists. This story has become a part of the communist party’s propaganda machine.

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Dong Ba Market – A 2 story market complex with individuals selling produce, sweets and clothing. This is a must visit in Hue.

Hue Walking Street – A relaxing walking street along the Perfume River lit up by laterns. Enjoy street food and tourist shops.

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Perfume River

Gia Long Tomb – This tomb, of the first emperor to unite Vietnam and move the capital to Hue, is off the beaten track.

Ho Quyen – This is an overgrown stone arena where elephants and tigers would fight (1830-1904) as a royal pastime. As elephants often represented royalty, the tigers teeth and claws would be removed to ensure defeat.

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Stacia and Nick’s Food Tour

Hang Me Me- Order the Banh Beo (royal rice cakes topped with shrimp and pig fat) and Banh Nam. These are local specialties and unique eats.

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Com Hen- Order the com hen (rice, herbs and oysters) or bun hen (noodles, herbs and oysters). I ordered the bun hen (without the hen) and it was one of the most flavorful dishes I have had. I also ordered an unknown desert drink which ended up being sweet corn with milk and rice.

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$0.44 bun hen (without the hen)

Che Hue – Women line the street selling che hue, sweets served over ice (purple sweet potato, sweet bean paste, coconut milk, tapioca pudding, banana, etc.). Street vendors also sell varieties of sticky rice, sweet potato with sweet coconut milk/ peanut crumbs, spongey coconut rice cakes, and banh cha (sweet waffles shaped like fish).

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Banh Cha

Lien Hoa – Maybe I am biased, but this was my favorite meal in Vietnam. At this Buddhist vegetarian restaurant we enjoyed fried jackfruit, banh beo, mecan (wheat gluten), spring rolls and sweet porridge.

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Fried jackfruit with sesame

Bun Bo Hue – A local dish similar to bun cha in Hanoi except with beef, fried oysters and lemon grass.

Banh Khoai – A local dish, fried rice crepes filled with pork, shrimp and bean sprouts.

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Juan Thai Phu – We ordered the famous bun thit nuong (grilled pork with vermicelli, herbs and peanuts)

Mandarin Cafe – Enjoy a coffee while flipping through binders of Mr. Cu’s remarkable Vietnamese portraits.

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