Jodhpur & Udaipur

Nick and I spent 2 days in Jodhpur, the blue city. Traditionally, the highest caste, Brahmins or priests, painted their homes blue. Now, not only Brahmins, but also individuals in other castes paint their homes blue to add to the vibrant hue of the city.

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Jodhpur, the blue city

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Like in most Rajasthani cities, the prize of the city was the fort. We explored the fort, the clock tower and watched little donkeys carry heavy loads of rocks to and from work sites throughout the city.

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Jodhpur’s clock tower

We took an 8-hour government bus to the last Rajasthani city on our list, Udaipur. On the ride we noticed a change in dress. Local males wore hot pink or enormous turbans (pagris), which we learned, can tell one’s region, caste and social class. The women wore thick matching plastic bangles from their shoulders to their wrists. Widest near the shoulder then smallest toward the elbow. Then they would start again, the widest at their elbow and smallest at their wrist. No part of their arm was exposed and the funnel of plastic was very unique to this area.

Udaipur is known as the city of (manmade) lakes. The landscape was hilly with bodies of water dispersed throughout. Nick and I CouchSurfed with an extremely friendly family, which included, Raja (King), Rani (Queen) and their daughter. We enjoyed interesting conversations and researched international universities that offer scholarships to Indian citizens for their daughter. The mother and daughter were more than upset to find out I wasn’t carrying any cosmetics on me as they love foreign cosmetics. The mother told us that she felt unlucky to have been born in India, as she was an intelligent and hard working woman, but her currency wasn’t worth anything and because acquiring foreign visas is difficult for Indian residents she will never be able to leave. When her husband, Raja asked us about our new president, Rani interrupted, only to tell us that a famous Bollywood actor (who has god-like status in India) went to visit the U.S. however was either refused or the process took hours, as he was Muslim. Later in Mumbai, we drove past this Bollywood actor’s house, to hear the story again by another CouchSurfer. Exaggerated or not, this was extremely embarrassing and a terrible reflection of our new administration and the travel ban.

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CouchSurfing with Rani (Queen)

On our first evening in Udaipur, Nick and I hiked a small hill to enjoy a sunset point. The next day we visited a famous 18th-century haveli (Bagore-Ki-Haveli) with 138 rooms and the city palace. This palace, built in 1599 was the largest in Rajasthan. It was the most restored and really gave a complete understanding of what it must have been like as a royal family at that time. The palace was enormous and grand and the museum seemed to go on forever. After, Nick got a 40 R ($.62) straight razor shave.

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Sunset over Udaipur, the lake city
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Nick dancing with Rajasthani puppets at Bagore-Ki-Haveli
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City Palace

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Nick’s 62 cent straight razor shave

The next day, we visited a Hindu temple at the center of town and Nick worked on applications. The end of our trip is beginning to come into sight and neither of us are ready. We walked around some lakes and experienced a hindu funeral. We saw parade of men walking by us as and they threw flowers onto a deceased man they carried. His face was powdered with colors. We watched as his body slowly turned into a cloud of smoke. We were thankful to experience this tradition. We learned that woman are never allowed to attend funerals, as they are more emotional than men. Some foreign traditions seem strange, however at least wives are no longer being burned with the husbands. We ended our last day by visiting the Monsoon Palace (Sajjan Garh) for a beautiful sunset with psychotic and aggressive food driven monkeys.

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View from Mansoon Palace

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Sajjan Garh

 

Favorite Eats:

  • Hotel Priya- best lassi ever. Thick yellow custard flavored with saffron topped with dried fruits and nuts. They also have the biggest dosas ever!
  • Om Juice – right behind the northern gate, serves great mango lassis
  • Start the morning at an omelet shop at the northern gate and wash it down with some chai
  • Millets of Mewar – a delicious organic Indian fusion restaurant that offers vegan and gluten free options.

Jaipur & Pushkar

We arrived to Jaipur, the pink city (although I thought more peach) by train. We ate delectable masala paneer dosas at the train station before catching a 45 R ($0.69) Uber to our CouchSurfing host’s home. Nick and I love Couchsurfing as we meet local people and learn about a city from the inside. Our host’s wife, a professional cook, made us delicious homemade meals and we enjoyed spending time on the rooftop, watching kites litter the sky.

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Jaipur, the pink city

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CouchSurfing at Joshi’s

Our first full day in Jaipur, we visited Jantar Mantar, an observatory built in 1728. This UNESCO World Heritage site included “instruments of calculation” and the world’s largest sundial. After, we visited Hawa Mahal and walked up an ancient tower for a view of the city. Next, we visited Tiger Fort.

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Hawa Mahal, 1799
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The world’s largest sundial

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Tiger Fort

On our second day, we woke up, drank creamy lassis and headed to the Amber Fort. This expansive fort with secret alleys and rooms was built in 1599. It was amazing to see how many tourists were interested in riding elephants when there are warnings in our guidebook and on the internet that suggest not to encourage the poor condition in which these animals are kept and treated. When elephants are being jabbed by their owner, ridden along city roads with honking motorbikes, and have open sores, maybe you should considering walking. Outside of the fort, Nick and I walked to an old stepwell. After, we visited the Albert Museum before running some errands and heading back to Joshi’s, our Couchsurfing host. We spent the evening hanging out with a couple from Angola and discussed hip-hop, corruption and exchanged travel stories.

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Lassiwalla
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Amber Fort

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Panna Meena Baori (stepwell)

After 3 nights in Jaipur, Nick and I packed our bags and headed to Pushkar. Pushkar is known by locals as a Hindu pilgrimage town with a holy lake and over 52 bathing ghats. No meat, alcohol or eggs were served in this town. It is also a touristed hippie backpacker oasis that offered cheap accommodations and food. The town was extremely friendly and Nick and I found that the western influence seemed to have positive influence on the local culture rather than negative like we’ve seen in other parts of Asia. Most travelers seemed to spend 1 week to 3 months there, when we asked some foreigners how they filled their time, they simply said, “drink chai.” After 2-days of exploring and meeting up with our friends from Angola, Nick and I avoided the tempting trap to relax and continued on our way.

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Pushkar
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3 of 52 bathing ghats