Jakarta & Yogyakarta

Jakarta was polluted and congested. We spent the majority of our time bussing to and from bus stations trying to arrange our transport for the next day to Yogyakarta. We were traveling during the busiest time of year, Eid Al Fitr. Everyone was leaving the city to spend time with their family and a news crew was covering the mayhem at the station. The next day we spent 19 hours on the road, only to travel 550 km (340 miles).

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Jakarta Cathedral

We arrived to Yogyakarta (Jogja) just in time to meet up with our CouchSurfering friend, Isa, and celebrate the end of Ramadan. We went to a local parade in Yogyakarta with lots of kids, costumes and floats. Of the 30 mosques that performed in front of judges, a story that stood out to me most was about terrorism. It started with kids being beaten and killed with cardboard guns and swords by teenage terrorists. Their tank float followed with fireworks. The message was simple, people associate Islam with terrorism, but 95% of people killed by terrorists are Muslim.

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The next morning was Ek and Nick, Larry, Kaitlin and I went to the local square to watch early morning prayer. 5,000 individuals filled the green. It reminded me of Easter in the US in that families were dressed to the T in matching custom fabrics. The genders separated, men to the front and women to the back. Everyone laid out a piece of newspaper and proceeded to place their personal carpet on top. Women put on loose fitting coveralls, which hid their colorful new outfits. After a few minutes prayer was over and all that was left was a field full of crumpled newspapers and street food vendors.

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Morning Payer

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We enjoyed some amazing meals and different variations of local coffee. Whether we bought juicy sweet tofu off of a women selling fried goods from a basket on the street or were sitting on mats on the sidewalk we had a blast. Young musicians played guitar and violin and we enjoyed walking around the old dutch quarter. Below is a list of local foods and drinks.

  • Local coffee (kopi):
    • kopi luwak (civet coffee) – expensive, full bodied, cat poop coffee. The local palm civet, catlike animal, eats coffee berries, and passes the inner pit through its digestive system intact. The stomach enzymes are believed to add value to the flavor of the coffee.
    • Java coffee (named after the island of Java)- ground into powder and drank as the grounds settle
    • kopi joss (charcoal coffee) – My absolute favorite. Powdered local grounds were spooned into a glass cup and mixed with water. Then a red hot charcoal was placed right in the coffee. It has a perfect roasted flavor.
      Spiced coffee
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Bottom Right to Left- Poop, Cleaned Poop with Rice, Washed Poop      Top Left to Right- Baked Beans, Roasted Beans, Ground Beans
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Pet Civet
  • Local dishes:
    • gudeg – young jackfruit, coconut milk curry, fried tempe, peanuts, chicken, water spinach and rice
    • nasi langgi – coconut sticky rice with with fried tempe wrapped in a banana leaf
    • sweet fried tofu/ tempe – perfectly juicy soy made with palm cigar, tamarind, cloves and shallot
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Gudeg

After the morning prayers Larry and Kaitlin went to the beaches south of Yogyakarta which they reported were very nice despite it being low tide with a lot of rocks.

Nick, Larry and Kaitlin visited both Prambanan and Borobudur temples. Prambanan is a 9th century Hindu temple dedicated to Shiva the god of destruction. The temple was comprised of one main temple for Shiva and his reincarnates. The outer temples were dedicated to children and wives. The panels around the sides of the temple told the stories of the Hindu epics and were in remarkable shape being 1200 years old. The temples were abandoned in the 10th century and collapsed in an earthquake in the 16th century. They were only refurbished in the last 60 years and later dedicated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. After the Prambanan they went to Plaosan a temple dedicated to the Buddhist queen of one of the Hindu kings. This marriage is what reconciled the conflict between the Hindu and Buddhist cultures 1200 years ago.

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Shiva
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Story Panel
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Temple

The following day Nick, Larry and Kaitlin went to a Borobudur the main Buddhist site for the Empire that fought against the Hindus at Prambanan. Borobudur is the largest Buddhist temple in the world. With over 500 meditating buddha statues and 2,600 relief panels telling Buddhist stories, it was a very impressive site. Pilgrims come from all Buddhist countries to pay homage to one of the greatest Buddhist empires of history. The introduction of Islam and the collapse of the Buddhist and Hindu empires led to the abandonment of both these sites less than 150 years after being built.

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Sunrise Above Temples
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Sunrise Buddha
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Volcanoes of Java

Unfortunately, I stayed back to work on my summer assignments for my MBA. Nick has done an impeccable job planning and I like to believe I’ve done a great job documenting the trip. However, to give me time to focus on my schoolwork, Nick has agreed to write the remaining blog posts for NZ and Australia, whoop whoop! Stay tuned.

Restaurant Recommendations:
Via Via – impeccable western and Indonesian food, amazing atmosphere and even better wifi
Gudeg Tugu – chicken or tofu gudeg, our favorite meal in Indonesia
The House of Raminten – we didn’t make it here as it was closed for Ramadan, but it came highly recommended by our Couchsurfer

Kathmandu & Pokhara

Although Nick and I were having a hoot in India, after 2 months we were beginning to feel exhausted. We crossed into Nepal by land and the difference was night and day. Nepalis smiled at us and helped us cross the border. They made sure we got on the right bus and pointed out their favorite momo hut. Nick thought it was all a trick or maybe we were getting scammed but I assured him that Nepalis were the kindest of them all. The 11 hour bus ride from the Indian border to Kathmandu was exciting to say the least. We were surprised by how undeveloped the only road into the capital was and we followed a deep gorge the entire way. We saw vehicles teetering off the edge and although our bus driver drove like a lunatic (like all bus drivers in Asia) we were thankful when we arrived safely.

I was elated to be back in Nepal and although Kathmandu was dusty and touristed I was excited to return. The affects from the 2015 earthquake were very present and Kathmandu reminded both Nick and I of the soviet era capital of Mongolia (Ulan Batar). We appreciated the law against unnecessary honking. We watched people line the street and march for their favored party in the upcoming election. The election was a big deal as this was the first local election in 20 years. Nick and I spent a few days running errands and arranging our trek to Dolpo before picking up Larry and Kaitlin (our friends from Hawaii) from the airport. Before trek we spent a few days exploring the city.

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Boudhanath Stupa
  • We spent Buddha’s birthday at Boudhanath Stupa
  • Durbar Square (UNESCO World Heritage Site)
  • Pashupatinath Temple (Hindu)
  • Swayambhunath Stupa
  • Garden of Dreams

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My highlight was spending time with Sri and Tsewang, friends I met in Nepal in 2012 and later worked with when I worked for an adventure travel company, Above the Clouds. We had many meals together and gained local knowledge on the election, Mustang, politics, and climate change.

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After our 20+ day on trek (Dolpo Trek blog post), Nick, Larry, Kaitlin and I were excited to head to Pokhara, mostly looking forward to bathing and eating. I remembered Pokhara as a small lakeside city with lychee trees and ping pong. However, the amount of development and construction in the past 5 years was astonishing. It felt like any college town from the states plopped into the rainforest. There were hundreds of hotels and I was surprised to see fast food chains and box stores.

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Before leaving Kathmandu we were thrilled to find lychee season begun! We prompty ate 4 pounds of lychee and many mangos before boarding our flight for Indonesia!

 

Kathmandu Eats:

Momo Hut- palak paneer momos, palak and peanuts, garlic and cheese chilimomos

Utse- a Tibetan restaurant that offers great hot pots and Tongba (hot water poured over fermented millet)

Fren’s Kitchen- great tofu steak and best wifi in Thamel

Fire & Ice- a delicious pizza place for Western cravings after trek

Rosemary- Western breakfast

Lassi- a delicious local lassi stand on Thamel Marg (40 R for a small, 70 R for a large)

Dolpo Trek

 

Roads- 5 years ago I had a remarkable experience in Mustang, Nepal. Nick and I knew that we wanted to travel in a remote area (specifically in Western Nepal), however heard that Mustang changed due to a newly built road. We wanted to experience a culture not yet impacted by connectivity and decided to trek in Dolpo, Nepal. We were thrilled that Nick’s childhood best friend Larry and his partner Kaitlin would be joining us from Hawaii.

During our 20+ days on trek, we noticed that there seemed to be no thought that went into the development of roads, specifically around how it would impact the local culture. People seem to come into remote areas and build roads before there is even access to vehicles (we saw this in the canyon to Nawwapani). Our guide told us that locals expect there to be a road connecting Dolpo in 3-4 years. People want development and access, however it doesn’t seem like there is enough thought in the planning, only considering immediate economic impacts. On our travels, we found that roads in Darjeeling were well planned. Locals had access to the road, however it was about a half-hour walk and it not only preserved the environment, but also the culture.

Money- When trekking, most tourists give all of their money to a large company in Kathmandu to plan and arrange their entire trip. We found that although this approach is more encompassing, it is more expensive and only supports some local staff. We found that it was hard to arrange a trek in remote areas without strong contacts. In Mongolia, Nick and I got lucky with a local recommendation from Lonely Planet, however in Nepal, we compromised with using a company to find our guide and help with permits and flights. We decided to pay for food and shelter as we went. We were surprised to learn that during our guide’s 16 years of guiding, this was the first time he had lead a trip like this in Dolpo.

We were happy with our decision as we felt we were paying more to the local community in comparison to a big trekking group. In many small villages, we were able to stay with a family in a teahouse, while another group (the only trekking group we saw in 21 days) camped outside and ate food brought from Kathmandu. We feel our approach allowed for a more authentic experience, however was more difficult as we carried our own gear, ate 28 dhal bhat meals (lentils and rice), and got cold and wet. Later, we did discover that our guide and 2 porters were not getting paid what we were told, however tried to compensate this by providing them with a nice tip at the end.

Yartsa Gunbu- This fungus grows on insects found above 13,000 ft. in mountainous regions of Nepal and Tibet. In Tibet, it is literally translated to “winter worm, summer grass.” It is valued in China as an herbal remedy and 1 kg is valued at $20,000. Yartsa Gunbu is predominately found in the Dolpo region of Nepal. The Chinese created this economy and most families in Dolpo earn their yearly income in 3-4 weeks of collecting, then focus on sustenance farming the rest of the year. Every year, less and less Yartsa Gunbu is found. It’s a double edge sword because it provides an economic opportunity, however there is no regulation on how collectors treat the environment. Trash, feces and make shift tents litter mountain passes. Camps run on a Yartsa Gunbu economy and locals trade one piece ($5) for a beer. Police are sent to the mountains and monitor remote areas for security. Collectors seem to treat each other well, they look together and families send their children up to collect in order to make money.

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$2,000 worth of Yartsa Gunbu

Day 1- We flew from Nepalgunj to Juphal and the highlight of the mountainous flight was the scary landing. We hiked 3 hours through green barley fields and a deep dry valley to Dunai. The view was remarkable and the snow capped mountains were a constant reminder we were trekking in the Himalayas. In Dunai, curious kids greeted us and directed us to a teahouse. Tibetan Buddhist prayer flags flew from the top of each home and elders walked around the town spinning prayer wheels and counting mala beads.

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Day 2- We hiked 5 hours to Chhepka. We began in the desert, followed a raging blue/ green river, and then hiked in woods. Mossy trees, birds, suspension bridges, and rain. We passed abandoned villages as all of the locals moved to higher elevation to search for Yartsa Gunbu. The woman at the local teahouse made the best Tibetan butter tea. We noticed one of our porters being treated poorly as he was Buddhist and the other porter and guide were Hindu. He carried a heavier load and was responsible for far more tasks in comparison. We read about this phenomenon in The Snow Leopard, which was written in he 70’s and were surprised to see it continuing to happen today.

Day 3- We hiked for 5 hours up and down to Chunnuwaur. We continued to follow the river and eventually exited tree line. We passed many lines of horses and mules, the head animal wore a beautiful bell and headdress made of yak hair.

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Day 4- 3 ½ hour hike to Phoksundo Lake. We hiked up to a viewpoint and saw a spectacular waterfall. We were greeted by smiling snot-covered kids in Ringmo, holding their hands together screaming “Namaste.” We played Frisbee near the glistening lake and visited an 800-year-old Bon monastery. Bon is religion that came to Tibet before Buddhism, however buddhist doctrines and rituals have been incorporated making it the sixth branch of Tibetan Buddhism. We walked past stupas, and noticed the auspicious swastika symbol is reversed in Bon (yungdrung).

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Phoksundo Lake

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Day 5- Phoksundo Lake is 3 miles long, ½ mile wide and ½ mile deep. There is no life in or on the fresh water lake; there are no algae, fish, or boats. Today, we took a “rest day” and hiked 4 ½ hours along a ridge above the lake. We had a great view of Upper Dolpo. We listened to wild jackals in the evening and watched mules eat salt. When the man of the teahouse returned from visiting his second wife, he made us a delicious roasted marijuana seed (non psychotropic), tomato and chili paste to eat with our dhal bhat. We learned that the communist party may have won the election and wondered how this would affect Nepal’s political future.

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Day 6- 2 ½ hours to Yak Kharka then 3 hours to Bagala basecamp. We had beautiful views overlooking the gorge and looking back at lake. We dropped into a green meadow with glaciers surrounding us. We ate lunch in Yak Kharka, a village that consisted of 1 stone home, covered in drying dung. We ate with a group of 15-year-old girls going to the mountains to collect. They said they would spend 15 days collecting and expected to find 1 Yartsa Gunbu per day. Dark clouds chased us up the valley as we hiked to Bagala base camp. I noticed the running river, brown dirt surrounding the river and green lush grass. Tan desert rocks lined the canyon. Melting ice turned into waterfalls, horses grazed and yaks moved to lower elevation. We set up camp at 4,500m (14,763 ft.) just in time for snow. The pass and glaciers sat in the clouds; we were in a snow globe.

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Day 7- We were the first trekkers of the season to hike up and over Bagala Pass 5,169 m (16,958 ft). We crossed an icy river in the morning and saw blue sheep above. I heard rocks move above us as the ice began to melt. We saw big marmots, purple flowers and huge glaciers. We hiked for 6 ½ hours, and along the ridge of a valley at the end. We didn’t need any altitude medications, however felt slow. Our heart rate and breathing increased and we felt nauseous. We slept at the base of Numala Pass.

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Day 8- Again, we were the first trekkers of the season to cross over Numala Pass 5,300 m (17,600 ft). Although higher, this pass felt easier than Bagala. We came down into a high and dry environment that reminded me of Mustang, which made sense as I could see upper Mustang behind some mountains. We could see dark storm clouds but were so high we could also see clear baby blue skies above. We walked down mossy meadow humps, saw herds of big furry yaks and followed the river to Dho Tarap. We saw ancient homes, piles of drying dung, green houses and motorbikes (which are walked 2 days from Tibet during an open 1 month trade agreement). We saw tsampa (ground barley) being ground by the power of the river. We visited a school and hiked for a total of 7 hours.

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Numla Pass 17,600 ft.

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dung pile

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Day 9- Rest day. We visited a 700-year-old Bon Monastery, Ribo Bhompa Gonpa. We watched the locals plow fields with yaks. I spent time playing with a young girl who lived at the teahouse and was fascinated how she imitated her mother. Growing up, I remember pretending to talk on a cell phone or use a credit card but this young girl was pretending to herd goats, grind chilies and carried her doll on her back wrapped in a scarf. Larry, Kaitlin, Nick and I played cards and drank local barely wine.

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Day 10- It seems like the landscape changed every 2 days. Today was dry with waterfalls, it reminded me of the Southwest, USA. Nick, Larry and Kaitlin ate blue sheep at lunch, the first time eating meat since we left Kathmandu. Every tea house/ tea house tent seemed to carry Chinese products. Rice bags, soda cans, and ramen wrappers were written in Chinese. Goat and sheep covered the hiking trail and we trekked for 7 hours. I watched a goat/ sheepherder roll wool on a hand spindle while he walked.

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Day 11- Kaitlin was sick. We were back in the forest following the river and the grassy mountains resembled Switzerland. The hills were alive with the sound of music. Dhal bhat was getting more expensive at 500 R ($5) per plate while in Kathmandu it was 100 R ($1). We saw enormous 200 ft. trees, it reminded us of Colorado. We camped at a lower elevation and the climate was hot. We slept in a meadow with purple lavender like flowers and horse skeletons. Part of the trail shimmered in the sun and the silver rock looked like glitter. We hiked for 7 hours total.

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Day 12- Today, we hiked from 6:45 am to 4 pm and gained 1,500 m (4,921 ft.) in elevation. It was a hard day and my legs felt like Jell-O-O. Wild marijuana grew everywhere, Gompa Village sat in the mountains where walnut trees grew. We met a man traveling from Upper Dolpo who had lost his 11 yaks and was on a journey to find them. We stopped by some hot springs (tatopani) and had to bush wack for an hour back to the main trail. Nick had back pain. We walked with the Nepali military sent to monitor the Yartsa Gunbu collecting which began the following day. We were happy when we made it to the top, however the last hour walk in the pouring rain was cold and frustrating. We camped at Jangla Base Camp 4,300 m (14,100 ft).

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28 dhal bhat meals (lentils & rice)

Day 13- We were surprised with Nepali sweets from Bchandra’s family (one of our porters) who was camping close by to collect. We hiked over Jangla Pass in a cloudy meadow and dreamt of food, as we were getting sick of dhal bhat. Larry made a great discovery of covering your poo with dried yak poo when no rocks could be found. Genius. We had an easy day (4 hours) and napped in the afternoon although breathing was difficult due to the elevation. We played cards in the evening.

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Day 14- We woke up to rain, then snow, and waited for an hour in hopes of better weather. Eventually, our guide said, “We must go over the pass or we may have problems.” We trekked over the snowy pass not able to see far in front of us. We came down to a tent camp, where collectors were staying. We left the canyon and were back in a lush forested environment. The landscape reminded Nick and I of Northern Vietnam. Waterfalls, Rhododendron, moss, fallen leaves. Women wore clothing that looked similar to hill tribe clothing in Southeast Asia. It began to rain as we approached Dhule. We hiked for 6 1/2 hours. We spent the evening in Dhule, which was busy with collectors and helped locals clean Yartsa Gunbu with toothbrushes. We hung out with some local kids and ended the evening with dhal bhat, mutton and tongba (warm millet beer).

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Day 15- We spent the evening under a leaky roof during a thunderstorm. We had roti (similar naan) for breakfast and were not use to the aspect of chewing, as dhal bhat does not require such strong jaw muscles. We hiked along terraced fields (corn, potatoes, squash, green onion and millet) and honeybee logs. We learned that 1 family of bees live in a log per season and our guide gets 200 kg of honey per year from 20 logs. We hiked through forest. Birds chirped, water rushed and we spent a few hours at hot springs. We hiked for 4 hours through lush forest to Kayam, a village of 2 homes. When the clouds lifted we were surprised with a breathtaking view.

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Day 16- Our guide and porters collected wild bamboo shoots for dinner and stole lettuce from gardens. We observed bridges, rain and moss. We stopped in Thakur, where the clay home with a thatched roof provided us with fresh buffalo milk. The home was dark and smoky and we ate dhal bhat for lunch. Goat and buffalo meat hung above the wood stove to dry. We hiked for 3 hours today and camped on an unprotected saddle.

Day 17- We got little sleep due to high winds and rain, and our tent repeatedly collapsed. The next morning we trekked over a small pass. There was a lot of rain and we continued to drink copious amounts of buffalo milk. At lunch I was embarrassed after my new dog friend came running up to me in the woods and ate my waste before I had time to even think.

After 5 hours of trekking, we entered the hunting reserve and the national park pass was 3x what we expected. We spent the afternoon in Dhorpotan where Larry and Kaitlin played Frisbee with kids and Nick washed laundry in the river. I pumped water and had a lovely conversation in attempted Nepali with a local about her kids, siblings and age. The town consisted of scattered huts in a valley and there was no town center. Larry, Kaitlin, Nick and I played cards and ate an abundant amount of Indian snacks we bought from a nearby store. That evening Nick and I began to feel ill.

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Day 18- Thankfully today was a rest day in Dhorpotan. Due to overconsumption, food poisoning or a change and diet, Nick and I spent the previous night and early morning projectile vomiting into our camping pot, bags and in the backyard. Hundreds of dogs barked the entire night. The next morning the dog and chickens made sure to clean up our mess. It took 4 days for our (which now included Larry’s) system to get rid of the Indian snacks.

Day 19- Today, the weather was warm and sunny. We crossed suspension bridges, water buffalo roamed the woods and Larry found a leech on him. We were trekking at a lower elevation and walked through a dead forest that was killed by a fire 20 years earlier. The clouds looked so close, I watched them expand and they moved quickly. For the first time on our trip Nick and I mentioned missing home. Maybe because it had been so long since we had talked with our families; we were worried that everything was okay.

We passed snarling Tibetan Mastiffs showing their teeth. By day these dogs were chained but at night they roamed guarding homes. We sat on animal skins and ate dhal bhat for lunch. Nick, Larry and I were still sick from the Indian snacks and beginning to have sharp pain under our rib cage. Good thing we only had a few more days of trek! We camped and the clouds looked bright in the dark sky. We listened to cow bells and jackals in the evening. 4 ½ hours of hiking.

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Day 20- We woke up to a clear view of Dhaulagiri. This mountain consists of 5 peaks and is 5 miles tall or 7,900 m (26,810 ft). The clouds moved quickly over Jaljala Pass and our view of Dhaulagiri was quickly obstructed. We trekked 4 hours downhill to a teahouse where we ate candy and explored the town.

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Dhaulagiri, 26,810 ft.

Day 21- We took an adventurous 7 hour bus to Beni where we drove past snow covered peaks on a “road” that was carved into the mountain side. We ate some local plums, which were the first fruit we’d had in almost a month. At a bus stop we ate samosas and jalebis then boarded another bus headed for Pokhara. We reflected on our remarkable trek and looked forward to bathing.

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Dhal Bhat- 28 meals

Days camping- 11

Days in tea houses- 10

Other foreigners’ spotted- 6 (an anthropologist, linguist, trekkers and a runner)

 

 

 

The Hill Country

Kandy

Nick and I took a shared jeep, tuk-tuk, 3 flights and a taxi to meet Nick’s dad, Dan, in Colombo. Sri Lanka is an island the size of Virginia, south of India. It’s people have faced many hardships as civilians have died from Asia’s longest running war and tsunami. It is predominately Buddhist, hunting is illegal and its main export is black tea. We arrived at 3am and woke up at 6am to greet Dan and head to Kandy. Kandy was a quaint town surrounding a small lake. We immediately noticed that the culture and food differed from India. The people were warm, sensitive, and curious, however always seemed to try and sell you on something. Unknown if it was positive or negative, we always received a huge reaction when we said we were from the states as we didn’t meet many any other tourists from the US.

While in Kandy we visited the Ceylon Tea Museum which was in an old factory built by the British and we learned about the process of making, Sri Lanka’s famous, Ceylon black tea. After, we visited the Temple of the Tooth, which held Buddha’s tooth (Nick and I’s third time seeing a Buddha tooth relic). The complex was large and it was beautiful wandering around as the sun set.

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Nick excited to see his dad and take trains!
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Kandy Lake

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Temple of the Tooth
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Candles inside the temple complex

Dalhousie

Dalhousie was a small hillside town made up of stands selling to local pilgrims. Its hills were covered in bright green tea bushes and what looked like untouched forest. We woke up at 2am to hike Adam’s Peak or Sri Pada. This peak is a Buddhist, Christian, Muslim and Hindu religious site, climbed mostly by Buddhist pilgrims. It is believed that Buddha, Adam or Shiva’s footprint is at the top, depending on your religion. It was 7 km hike to the top consisting of 5,500 steps. Nick and I felt this had a similar feel of hiking to Golden Rock, a Buddhist pilgrimage in Myanmar, however was more developed and touristed with foreigners. The sunrise at the top was beautiful and the weather was perfect. Clouds settled on mountaintops and we could see Adam’s shadow from afar. We listed to the Morning Prayer at the top and passed tea pickers on our way back down.

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Sunrise from Sri Pada or Adam’s Peak

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Shadow of Adam’s Peak

We took the train from Hatton to Nanu Oya, where it felt obvious we were on the tourist loop. The individuals we saw on the train from Kandy were the same we saw hiking Adam’s Peak and now saw on the train. Sri Lanka is a small country and it seems like most backpackers are on the same loop. However, these places are popular for a reason. The train ride was spectacular and was one of Nick’s and my favorite! We drank milk tea while dangling our feet out of the door and Nick high fived local school kids as we passed by. We watched lush green tea fields pass and it felt like we were in “Jurassic Park”.

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Cheers to trains and milk tea
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Tea pickers

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Nuwara Eliya

When we arrived in Nuwara Eliya, we were in awe of the vibrant landscape rather than the small city center. It was an old colonial hill town with tea fields and brightly colored vegetables sold on the side of the road (leek, cabbage, carrots, beets, rhubarb, etc.) We spent our first day exploring some of the many waterfalls and at one point Nick was told, “You are very white man!” when swimming with the locals. After, we toured around 2 active tea factories built over 100 years ago. I’ll write another blog post with some tea details=)

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“You are a very white man!”

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Nick & Dan

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Senior portrait green screen

On our final day in Nuwara Eliya, we hiked a 9km loop in Horton Plains National Park. Our guide, knew all about the flora and fauna. We spotted wild black pepper, wild coriander and various herbs used to treat leukemia, depression, and even broken bones. We were also lucky to have not only heard but also seen purple-faced leaf monkeys in the forest. We arrived, to the World’s End, and although we could imagine the remarkable view to the ocean, we only saw fog. After driving back to town, our guide invited us to his home for dinner. We ate some delicious curry with string hoppers (rice noodles). We discussed politics, religion, and happiness. Our guide told us that Buddha’s teaching of the middle way was the most important, especially when it comes to money. People think that money can buy happiness and it can’t. While only living with enough money to survive is a hardship (something we can only imagine), a path in between can bring true satisfaction. We agreed. I truly felt like he was a compassionate individual with aspirations and sincere thoughts, however the scene was a little old. Countless times in Asia,  I’ve spent with intoxicated men while the woman do all of the work. Nonetheless, we had a terrific time and were thankful we were invited into his home. We left Nuwara Eliya the next morning and took a 7 hour bus to Marata, where we would enjoy the coast!

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Horton Plains National Park

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Kandy- The Empire Cafe, try the curry dishes and chai tea

Local foods to try: Kotthu (stir-fried chopped Roti), Vasai (deep fried lentil doughnut, train snack), hoppers, Binjol page (eggplant curry), buffalo curd with kitul (similar to yogurt and honey), and wattalappam (jaggery and cardamon custard).

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The Empire Cafe in Kandy
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Homemade meal

 

Sukhothai

The ruined capital, Sukhothai, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site constructed over 700 years ago. The word Sukhothai means “rising happiness” and is regarded as the blossoming of a unique Thai artistic identity. Here we saw Buddha figures, gravity warped towers and brick stupas.

By day, we roamed and relaxed in a park and were thankful for the free admission (due to the mourning of the king). However, by night, the relics came alive. Between December 3- January 3, the main chedi and stupas are sprinkled with candles and decorated with colorful lights. As music played it was easy to get lost in the magical and romantic scene of twinkling ruins.

Vote: What’s your favorite Buddha photo below?


Wat Si Chum

Wat Mahathat