West Sumatra

After taking a 3-month break from Southeast Asia, it was nice to return. Nick, Larry, Kaitlin and I purchased the cheapest flights from Kathmandu to Indonesia and landed in Padang (West Sumatra). The rice paddy fields, fresh fruit, street food and paved roads were back! 90% of Indonesian’s population is Muslim and it felt like we drove by a beautiful mosque every 5 minutes. Almost every woman wore a hijab and during the call to prayer you could hear it from every direction. The handful of Westerns we saw at the airport and in Padang had a surfboard in hand and was headed to the islands.

As we explored the clean, quant city during the day, it felt dead. Most of the restaurants were closed or had fabric veiling the door. We saw signs in Indonesian which translated to special service non-Muslims. This confused us. We walked along the river then near the ocean. Locals honked and screamed “hello.” Students interview Kaitlin to practice their English and the Indonesians smiled at us curiously. We laughed at the local mode of transportation, opelets, which were souped up vans with tinted windows, rims, and a pounding base. By 2 pm, large tables were set up along the road selling bags of noodles, sweets, and other foods “to-go”. We all took a nap, tired from only getting 2 hours of sleep during our transit and returned back to town for dinner. It felt like we were transported to a young hip city! There was street food everywhere and teens hung out at coffee, grass jelly juice, noodle, and meat kabobs carts. Then it clicked. All of these unique things were happening because we had arrived halfway through Ramadan, the largest Muslim holiday of the year. Although this eventually caused small complications with access to food, appropriateness of eating in public, increased traffic, and increased ticket fares; we were excited to experience the holiday.

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The next day, we took a bus to Harau Valley, often called the Yosemite of Asia. Tall walls of metamorphic rock lined the sides of the valley. Nick and I were looking forward to climbing, however the only rental shop was unfortunately closed due to the holiday. We stayed at Adhi Homestay, a cute cluster of bungalows that sat among waterfalls, flooded rice fields and fruit trees. We heard fruit constantly dropping out of trees, and enjoyed all sorts of fruit, including: bananas, jackfruit, passion fruit, wild guava, cacao, durian, soursop, dragon fruit, milk fruit, breadfruit, tamarillo, jicama, salak and coconuts. We ate our weight in passion fruit and I helped a girl climb a large tree to pick them. At 6:30 pm we heard a loud siren. Coming from Hawaii, Larry thought this was a tsunami siren. It followed with many call to prayers that echoed off the valley walls. This was the siren that marked sunset and those fasting were now allowed to eat. We learned that Muslims refrain from eating, drinking water, smoking cigarettes, and other worldly possessions (including sex) from sunrise (4:30am) to sunset (6:30pm). However, children and menstruating women do not participate the entire month.

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We spent a day relaxing, exploring nearby villages and taking a cooking class. We learned how to make chicken (young jackfruit for the veg option) rendang, a local Indonesian dish that is similar to a korma curry. We also made an eggplant and tempeh dish, and learned that tempeh originated in Indonesia. Unlike tofu, which is pressed soy milk (using mature soybeans (gold in color)), tempeh is made up of the entire bean, compressed. We also made some fried vegetable patties and banana jackfruit patties. We ate dinner with locals and foreigners and Nick, Larry and I had our cards read by a spunky local who had some surprisingly accurate things to say.

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On our last day in the valley, we hiked a steep ascent to enjoy a panoramic view. Volcanoes in the distance peaked out behind clouds and we could hear the call to prayer from the mosques below. The majority of the green valley consisted of flooded rice fields and fisheries. We observed henna, chili, clove and cacao growing. We saw a scary scorpion the size of my hand, but thankfully no snakes. Indonesia is notorious for its pythons. A few months ago a farmer disappeared in Sulawesi only to be found in the belly of a python nearby. Our guide informed us that this was rare, however in West Sumatra snakes eating children have become a pressing issue. The government has made it legal to hunt snakes for the local’s protection. We continued hiking through the jungle, crawled through caves and swam in waterfalls. Another surprising fact we learned was that Harau Valley was based off of a maternal society. Men had to pay a female’s mother to marry and it usually costs 16,000,000 rupiah ($1,200). It’s difficult for a man to find a wife as she must be in another group, approved by the village chief, and the man must be able to afford the dowry proposed by the mother. If a man is wealthy, like in many Asian countries, he can have many wives.

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That evening we took 3 modes of transportation to Northern Sumatra and traveled 515 kilometers (300 miles) in 16 hours.

Food:

Sari Rosa – similar to lunches in Myanmar, this local shop serves a dozen of small veg and non beg options and rice, you pay for the dishes you eat.

Try buff (water buffalo) or chicken rendang, chili grilled fish and abundance of tofu and tempeh. During Ramadan, sweets can be found everywhere. Try the fruit soup, green rice flower balls covered in fresh coconut and filled with palm sugar, butternut squash sweets or a pink coconut milk soup with tapioca squares.

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3 thoughts on “West Sumatra

  1. Hi Stacia I was so thrilled to read your blog. What an awesome way to document your adventures. I know this has been an amazing and wonderful experience for Kaitlin and Larry. Your writing and photos have helped me share in it. I only have looked at the most current and will spend some time going through the rest this weekend. Thanks so much! Kay Maloy

    Liked by 1 person

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